Notice: Purchasing, Trials and Accounts Have Changed. What You Need To Know: Part II >>

Topic - Orion Space Plane: 2001 A Space Odyssey

Page 3 of 11
First  Previous  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  Next  Last 
Quote from Mike James modo :

This movie still stands as a classic that was far ahead of it's time, in terms of effects, and I'm happy to see someone taking a serious stab at it. Hope you're having fun, and I for one, am looking forward to seeing the models and scenes you produce.


I'm more than a little surprised, that I've found only one 3D modeler who's done this model. It must have to do with the relative time frames. My neighbor is in his early twenties and worked for NASA up till 6 months ago. He and his wife have never seen the movie (hard to believe), which came out around 13 years before he was born.

How many 3D apps were there 43 years ago? Ha! The PC revolution began in 1975, 7 years after the release of 2001. And that's talking about the earliest chips.

Wikipedia says:
"The first true Personal Computer was the Sphere 1 computer, created in Bountiful, Utah in 1975 by computer pioneer Michael D. Wise (1949–2002). At first, Sphere 1 was sold as a kit, but was later sold as fully assembled PC. The Sphere 1 qualified as The First Personal Computer because it included a keyboard, a number pad, and a monitor. In 1976 Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak sold the Apple I computer circuit board, which was fully prepared and contained about 30 chips. The first successfully mass marketed personal computer was the Commodore PET introduced in January 1977, which bore a striking resemblance to Sphere 1 of two years earlier. It was soon followed by the TRS-80 from Radio Shack and the popular Apple II."

We are a brand new phenomena! On the other hand, physical modelers, like Ian Walsh, have been cranking out Orion for years. They have been around since Moby Dick was a minnow.

Guess it's not that surprising, after all.

WOW! page 3, and about to cross the 2000 views line. What has happened to Chuck C?

Message edited by LeonArtO3D on 10/23/2010 - 6:36 PM

Glad to see you doing this. 2001 was my inspiration as well. I was 17 when I saw 2001. We viewed it in Cinerama which was a process at the time where they had multiple projectors on a huge curved screen. It was the technical rage at the time. In those days they gave you a beautiful full color brochure. I held on to it fir years till it fell apart : (

The sequence of the Orion docking with the space station to the tune of the Blue Danube was stunning and from then on I was hooked.
Quote from JohnGonzales :
Glad to see you doing this. 2001 was my inspiration as well. I was 17 when I saw 2001. We viewed it in Cinerama which was a process at the time where they had multiple projectors on a huge curved screen. It was the technical rage at the time. In those days they gave you a beautiful full color brochure. I held on to it fir years till it fell apart : (

The sequence of the Orion docking with the space station to the tune of the Blue Danube was stunning and from then on I was hooked.


Hey, John! Welcome to mododyssey! LOL. Wish they'd have a revival. If I'm not a complete basket case by then, I'd like to model the launch, pictured in that sketch, lunadude posted. That's if I can get more details on the design of that launch vehicle. But I'll probably do Aries and Discovery first.

That space waltz was a world shaker.
To give you an idea of how I'm arriving at accurate drawings of the interior of the ship, here's one step of my manipulation of the poorly photographed blueprint, top view from the cockpit aft.

I used the tiny image from the previous page, first blowing it up and saving it as a separate file, a .psd. Then I increased the canvas size to allow for skewing, giving it plenty of border to work in. Then, I selected the gray area and transformed it with the skew tool...Oh yes, I also added numerous guides which I lined up approximately with centerlines and major bulkheads, windshields, etc.



I titled it, "Partial correction" because, while it's now more or less square with reference lines, the vertical and horizontal are not in the correct proportions. That correction will have to be done with reference to the single image of the blueprint which we have which is not distorted. I'll do the other image from the blueprint next, then manipulate both of these to match the one good image.

From there, Soon as I get confirmation on the actual size the ship was suppose to be, I can scale these drawings into the other drawings of the exterior.

I have to do an even more complicated operation with all the good, large images of the original model, abstracting out the information hidden in their angles of orientation. With the results from that operation, I'll have the data to correct all of the available drawings in my collection, into 100% accurate hull contours for my final model. Integrating all that information is quite some task. Oh, for a copy of those original blueprints!

Once again, thanks to all of you who have so generously posted, or otherwise sent me valuable data...and all those who are still sending me goodies.

Now I wonder if Brad is still trapped in a small town in France. LOL.

Enjoy

Message edited by LeonArtO3D on 2/8/2011 - 11:37 PM

The Size Of Orion III
Again, Information trickles in, this on the size Orion would be were it an actual ship...and yes, I do forget at times that it was not an actual ship. I'm not the only one...Go check this out:

Virtual virtual reality

Anyway.....

According to some of the early drawings of the Orion, it was postulated to be 175ft long-not counting the aft set of probes. It's wingspan was to be 85ft from tip to tip. This was an early blueprint drawing done at MGM based on Harry Lange's pencil drawings of the ship, but close enough to production that it would be accurate. It does have many of the final ships detailing and shaping.

A check of the Simon Atkinson drawing declares that the proportions are very close to those figures. I can't be sure yet as the images are slightly distorted as yet. But, let me see...my scaled drawing is 90.262" long, not counting the probes, so 175' divided by 90.262 = 1.938800381 ft. per inch of drawing. The wingspan = 46.068 X 1.938800381 = 89.31665596 Ft. That's only a 4 ft difference out of 85 ft. Not too bad, and can be attributed to a distortion in the drawing, the scan, because of the binding, or the original models proportions were changed during the modeling process. I'll cross check Ian's figures for an interim figure, but I wont know the exact proportions till I extrapolate them myself. I do know one thing. Clark cited 200 FT for the wingspan in the novel but that is clearly a figmo. 85 to 200 is too great a difference.

Physical model makers have been using a figure of 213 Ft for the length, which comes from the rumor(?) that the ship was 65 m long, and 65 m = 213.254 ft. Where they got that figure from I don't know, yet. I'll try to find out. One of you physical model makers following this thread can let me know.

That's it for now.

Message edited by LeonArtO3D on 10/25/2010 - 11:17 AM

I've just placed the order for Model Design and Blueprinting Handbook from ModelersNotebook(.com). I'll get it in about a week. Then the serious fun can begin! In the meantime, I've made some changes to my working drawing, that is, to the various copied and manipulated views of Simon Atkinson's drawings.

In my last calculation of the size and scale, I was measuring the entire length, including the probes, and this came out to be a slight fraction under 1 inch (of drawing)= 2 feet (of actual ship). Well, I decided a one to two ratio was perfect so I've manipulated the drawings to reflect this change, and at the same time, I changed the reference of length to not include the probes, just like the original blueprints. Now, the set blueprints will integrate perfectly, (I hope).

While making these changes, I also increased the overall size of my drawing canvas, to include the other views I'll be adding, the front and back views. I also made a copy of the starboard view and placed it at the top of the drawing and will alter it to show the port side view, that is, without the hatch, etc. This will help me later when I begin to texture my model. It is not placed properly yet, not altered, but this will serve ATM. I also scaled up the color drawing at the bottom, to match the other drawings. Here is a view of those changes:




Finally, I'd like to welcome the modelers from Eagle Transporter (dot COM) and Hobby Talk (dot COM), who are now following these pages, and in some cases, getting addicted to modo. Welcome to mododyssey, as I've taken to calling this project.
I got a request to model this, as part of the project.



And I'm thinking about it. That is my plan, but there is little to go on but this sketch. The original idea for the Orion was to have the aft section a booster...and then the front section would be a return vehicle. But, as you see in Bob McCall's ad rough...there was a powered flight ship that the Orion rode on...close or into Orbit. Returning, the Orion would have some power. There are intakes on the bottom of the ship that indicate some sort of air breathing engine capability. The authentic method for getting the Orion into orbit was never really solidified for the production...and we only have Clarke's descriptions in the novel. Still, one look at that ad and I was hooked. However, I'll be modeling Space Station V, Aries, Moonbus, Discovery, including the POD, first...Maybe even the Lunar Base and the site of TMA1. Orion will be the most difficult as it was shown the least of all the vehicles, and there is so little by way of reference material ATM.

Also, did you notice where they put the boarding tube in this sketch? Right in the middle of the windows secton of the hull. LOL. And on the wrong side of the ship. The Hatch is on the starboard side, forward of the passenger section.




For a humorous account of the ship see:
Sci-Fi Air Show

Nothing funny about this image. I want a big picture of it, with details of the landing gear. Please.

Message edited by LeonArtO3D on 2/1/2011 - 1:55 AM

Hi Leon I Just signed up...


Greart work so far.

Ian (Stargazer) Walsh


http://www.planet3earth.co.uk/stargazer%20models%20for%20sale.htm


http://www.planet3earth.co.uk/2001_a_space_odyssey.htm




Hey stargazer! Glad you could make it! You are one busy man.

Do you know the source of the 65m/213ft standard of length of Orion? The most 'official' standard I've heard came from the MGM Art Dept., that of 175ft length, not counting the aft probes; and 85ft wingtip to wingtip. A 38ft difference makes a considerable difference, especially when trying to fit the MGM cockpit plans, to those for the model.

I'm currently playing with that single cockpit blueprint image of a starboard xray view, scaling it till it is the same size as my reference drawing of the plane. That scale is 1 inch = 2 feet. That makes for a good sized original drawing with which to layout my model.

Anyone? I am still looking for a scan copy of those original blueprints. Let me know something.

PS: I have also been attempting to make contact with Simon Atkinson, if any of you know how to reach him. His site contact page is apparently dysfunctional. I noticed at his site, a reminder that his art work is copyrighted, and not to use it without permission. I'm a little late in asking, but better late than never. Particularly, since I want to see if he will let us use the unpainted, original pen and ink drawing as a modeling guide. With that I can create an .ai file(s). If you know the gentleman, please point him our way.

Message edited by LeonArtO3D on 10/28/2010 - 3:10 AM

"Do you know the source of the 65m/213ft standard of length of Orion"

Yes Me...

I am hoping that you will do similar to that I did
concerning fitting the 'fullsize interiors' (the sets) the flight deck and passenger cab, and see what you arrive at.

I dont know of anyone else (cept me) who has done this, and I would be interested to see what you make of it.

"MGM Art Dept., that of 175ft length"

I think that you will find that 175 came from the Aurora and airfix kits + the antenna...(About 13.5 inches long without antenna )

People have assumed for a long time that they are 1/144 scale

but the scale is not given on the boxes or instruction sheets

the models are very likly simply made 'box scale'..(to fit the box)

Message edited by IanStargazerWalsh on 10/28/2010 - 4:18 PM

Quote from IanStargazerWalsh :
"Do you know the source of the 65m/213ft standard of length of Orion"

Yes Me...

I am hoping that you will do similar to that I did
concerning fitting the 'fullsize interiors' (the sets) the flight deck and passenger cab, and see what you arrive at.

I dont know of anyone else (cept me) who has done this, and I would be interested to see what you make of it.

"MGM Art Dept., that of 175ft length"

I think that you will find that 175 came from the Aurora and airfix kits + the antenna...(About 13.5 inches long without antenna )

People have assumed for a long time that they are 1/144 scale

but the scale is not given on the boxes or instruction sheets

the models are very likly simply made 'box scale'..(to fit the box)


"box scale"! Got a good laugh out of that one. I can imagine that sort of thing coming out of corporate offices.

If Airfix used that figure, then they got it from MGM.

Yes, I was so taken by your explanation of how you did your layout, I raved about it to friends 'in the know' about the movie production. One of them sent me this in an email:

"I see by the latest posts that someone has sold a copy of one of Fred Ordway's blueprints of the Orion set."(that's the one from the book you sent me).."I checked Ian's site and his plan view of the Orion interior. As you can see from the one sold on eBay, he has an extra space between the cockpit and the galley/coat storage area. This area, of which there are numerous photos, is a galley/coat stowage area/ stewardess seat and monitor. In the original shooting of the movie, Heather Downham, who was the "Pan Am pen plucking stewardess" would have been monitoring Floyd in the passenger compartment....there was film shot for her video monitor that would have shown the pen floating around. She then would have gotten out of her seat and gone in to get the pen. There are no close up images of her monitor arrangement...but from photos one can get the layout."

I remember you saying you were shifting things around a bit, and later, after acquiring those dimensions from the MGM drawings of Orion, I thought mayhaps, the need to shift things and change the windows was due to this scale difference. That's why I'm rescaling the blueprints to match the scale of the drawings of the fuselage, which are now scaled to the 175ft length.

Your work inspired me to redo all my drawings from scratch, and to purchase the book, Model Design & Blueprinting Handbook, which is the Bible of modelers, or should be. I'll have my copy in a couple of days, but I've already started making the scales match on reference images. I'll detail what I'm doing as I go along and make the files available so you all can cross check me, and apply that critical eye. I'm nothing if not brave. LOL

EDIT: On that length of 175ft, Ive said before that the drawings are scaled and sized so that the length is 175 and the drawing is scaled to 1" = 2', but in Photoshop, with my screen resolution, the closest I could get was a drawing that is 87.503", that's .003" too big. Since the plane is twice that length, instead of 175ft., it's 175.006ft. May the modeling gods forgive me. It's kind of new to me. I've never done a blueprint that's 87.5 inches long before. Jeeez! Anyone think that's overkill?

Message edited by LeonArtO3D on 10/28/2010 - 7:01 PM

Frederick I. Ordway III

2001: A Space Odyssey in Retrospect

I looked him up thinking he might let us have the original drawings. I saw right away that he is getting up there in age, born in 1927, 83 years. Wikipedia listed his publications and I found this one which is highly interesting and entertaining.

2001: A Space Odyssey in Retrospect

Enjoy!
I was not kidding about box scale...its well known in the 'hard copy' model world...

as an example
http://www.airspotters.com/corgi-toy-vulcan---white-livery-fit-the-box-scale-9281-p.asp

I wonder if you missunderstand about what I am getting at.

The full size interiors were 'real' in that they were made 1/1 scale (full size)

Try to fit the (scaled down) 1/1 inierior sets into the Orion fuselage and see what is the smallest size that the fuselage 'has to be' for it all fit (without cheating of the interior set sizes).



"This area, of which there are numerous photos, is a galley/coat stowage area/ stewardess seat and monitor".

I have a very extensive collection of pictures etc ...I have never seen these...
Can your source make them avalable?

I had to make do with 'barely glimpsed'



"As you can see from the one sold on eBay",

????



Message edited by IanStargazerWalsh on 10/28/2010 - 10:03 PM

Quote from IanStargazerWalsh :

I wonder if you missunderstand about what I am getting at.

The full size interiors were 'real' in that they were made 1/1 scale (full size)

Try to fit the (scaled down) 1/1 inierior sets into the Orion fuselage and see what is the smallest size that the fuselage 'has to be' for it all fit (without cheating of the interior set sizes).



That is precisely what I am doing, only the exterior drawings are 1" of drawing is equal to 2 feet of actual ship, so your 1 ft increments fall right on the grids, and ruler markings.

Quote from IanStargazerWalsh :

"This area, of which there are numerous photos, is a galley/coat stowage area/ stewardess seat and monitor".

I have a very extensive collection of pictures etc ...I have never seen these...
Can your source make them available?

I had to make do with 'barely glimpsed'



Unfortunately not. However, almost daily, Douglas Trumbull is posting new pictures on his site, which I keep adding to my collection.


"As you can see from the one sold on eBay",

????

These are the 4 tiny images on the previous page, of the blueprint, of which the cleaned up version with your markings, is but one. 4 little gray images in a row. I copied them from a site that announced the sale of the blueprint.


Message edited by LeonArtO3D on 10/28/2010 - 10:57 PM

Yesterday, I received my copy of MODEL Design and Blueprinting Handbook, by Charles Adams, and it's everything the reviewers have to say about it! And they say a lot. I recommend this book to any modeler, be it 3D Virtual Models, or hold-in-your-hand physical models. The more accuracy you require for your project, the more you need this gold mine of ideas and procedures. I find myself forgetting to eat and sleep. I can't get enough. It is much more than a refresher course in all those drafting skills I've forgotten, for it goes way beyond anything I was ever taught. So, do yourself a favor, cancel those plans to drop everything and go get your degree in engineering or architectural drafting for your modeling career. Save yourself 5 years, a lot of money and tedium, and get this book.

I've contacted the author and he has visited this thread. He has graciously given me his OK to make limited quotes and reproduction of images, where necessary to clarify a point. I take this opportunity to convey my thanks for writing this tome, just for us, at a price that makes it the best value of any in my growing collection. No, I'm not being paid to tout this jewel. Read the reviews for yourself.

Since it's on an earlier page, I'll repeat the link to ModelersNotebook here:

http://modelersnotebook.com/MDBH1-main.html

Message edited by LeonArtO3D on 11/4/2010 - 1:40 AM

A Big Thanks to Bill George of Sci-Fi Air Show, for sending me the large economy sized image of the Orion Space Plane, that looks 100% real! I'll post it here if he gives me permission. It's the little one shown above, with the link to his cool site.

I'm into some heavy duty modeling and will have something to show pretty soon. I won't ask for patience, when I don't have any myself. The current task is probably the most difficult to model, as I'm doing it all by ear! But I have to do it first or I can't attach the wings.

Hello, Leon!!

Got a message you have some sort of question for me?

Be glad to help if I can!



Chuck
Hi Chuck!

Thanks for the quick come back. I was wondering if you had made any headway on the stars tutorial, which we are all awaiting with baited breath(whatever the Hell that means). I mean we are all anxious to see it and learn from it! You can double that for me, personally. I was concerned that the wording of my reply to your offer, had put you off, and wanted to assure you that the tut would be most welcome. Also, you are welcome to email me anytime, round the clock.

That goes for the rest of you. I didn't want to post my email address here where everyone in the world could get it and start sending me spam, canned or otherwise. I will add it to my profile in non machine language. Oh well, may as well try it here for you all to translate: myusername without caps, at comcast (dot) net. Just because I'm paranoid, doesn't mean they are not out to spam me. LOL.

I'd rather exchange emails than post the multitude of data I get, here in the forum. Less clutter, and it's more personal. I'm sure some of you want to send me attachments that you don't want posted here, either. Let me know either way.
I'm taking the chance here that Bill George won't mind my posting this full sized image, when he didn't say anything about the smaller version. This is too cool to pass up with just a tiny image. This is one of the best Photoshoping jobs I've ever seen, not to overlook the modeling work. Then again, look where he works.

It just happened by chance, that I had just downloaded about 100 images of the Space Shuttles landing gear, plus those of several other aircraft, for later consideration when modeling the things not included in the original model for the movie. Then I got this email from Bill, with this image. Made me wonder if Industrial Light and Magic now has an ESP department.

I had to crop down the image width as the scrolling grew tedious real quick.




My thanks and great admiration to Bill George.

Message edited by LeonArtO3D on 11/11/2010 - 10:15 AM

Quote from LeonArtO3D :
Hi Chuck!
Thanks for the quick come back. I was wondering if you had made any headway on the stars tutorial, which we are all awaiting with baited breath(whatever the Hell that means). I mean we are all anxious to see it and learn from it! You can double that for me, personally. I was concerned that the wording of my reply to your offer, had put you off, and wanted to assure you that the tut would be most welcome. Also, you are welcome to email me anytime, round the clock.



Yeah, I got started on it, and then decided I was too disjointed in the presentation, and thought I'd write a bit of a script to follow. I get working in PS, and talking while recording, and....and..... well......I can't chew gum and walk at the same time. ;)

And then, to be quite honest, I got sidetracked and forgot about it altogether!

It's not a big deal really. I'll get back to it asap, and get it to you!

Sorry about that, Chief!
Quote from ChuckC :

...
And then, to be quite honest, I got sidetracked and forgot about it altogether!

It's not a big deal really. I'll get back to it asap, and get it to you!

Sorry about that, Chief!


No problem, Chuck. Look forward to it. On sidetracking...
Man, do I understand that! Only with me, the ideas come flooding in faster than I can write them all down, much less act on them. But it's all good. They come back later. There's an idea my subconscious mind has been trying to remind me of, that's one step beyond what is covered in this new book on drafting, an idea for calculating and correcting most any photo, to get a measurable result. Here's an image that is part of that process:



The colored planes, marked off in 1 foot squares, can of course be moved to intersect any part of the ship to get measurable results, and locate reference points.

With a photo, you draw lines that represent the centerline, and the box that surrounds the model, and you draw it at whatever angle the model in the photo is in. for any photo, you will be able to determine the exact location of some of the elements, and mark them. This information can be transferred to your master drawing, and every other drawing you have. This accumulates until they start supporting further discoveries, more reference points. Eventually, You have the whole map.

Essentially, you use the same technique used to draw the front and back views when you only have a top and side view to go on. It's a little more complicated to set up, but the results are far more revealing. I'll elaborate and illustrate the process when I finish the drawings.

I saw this and thought of you... ;)

Cooler Master HAF XM / Gigabyte GA-X79S-UP5 Wifi / Core i7 3730k 6 core @ 4.2ghz / Palit GTX 770 Jetstream / 16gb RAM
15" 2011 MacBook Pro / Core i7 Quad Core @ 2.2ghz / 8gb RAM

Quote from Sumimasen :
I saw this and thought of you... ;)


Thanks Sumimasen. I signed up, to get product information when the have any. Can't tell anything about quality from the small image. Edit: Here's a sneak peek:

moebius model of Orion

On the other hand, I'm reading, and downloading pictures of a model of Orion being made by Robert el at Hobby Talk, that is quite good:

Robert el's Orion

The thread started as a post on a Moonbus thread then split off as the Orion Space Clipper thread, then split again with this model, which currently has 8 pages and is loaded with step by step images, and well worth following. I'm only on page three, but I'm learning much about this models details by watching someone else build a physical model.

There is a similarity with Martin Bower's model, but, unfortunately, MB only gives us small images of his work, so there's little evidence of the quality of his craftsmanship, or details of his model. I've been told he will share a larger image if you can reach him by email, but so far, I can't tell if he got any of my emails. It's a shame because the small images do look good, and I expect him to be very good.

One thing is clear. The larger the model, the less they need exaggerated details.

Message edited by LeonArtO3D on 11/12/2010 - 11:53 AM

Tonight, I'm a very happy camper, for a major stumbling block has been removed from my path. I have been struggling with a design problem using two contradictory views of Orion...Actually, it was only one view of Orion, as the second view was any number of models based on Simon Atkinson's drawings. Thanks to Steve Mavronis, over at Hobby Talk Forum, I got this image of Orion, with the light and attitude of the model just right to show up these features:



Thank you Steve for posting this image of the original model. I doubled it's pixel count, as it's already a small image, so there is a bit more fuzz to it than I'll have later on, but the essential thing is, one can clearly see the fuselage that extends below the level of the wings, and you can follow the changes in the hulls curvature from the mouth to the probes, along that bottom edge where it varies in it's degrees of arc. Thus proving, the wings are not flat and level with the bottom of the ship. Before this, I was studying the hull contours as they change from the mouth back to the landing lights where the wing starts, as this is radically different from the models I've played with and the drawings I've studied. The following image of Orion, colored oddly for some kind of test, shows this area at the front of the ship that flares out to meet the wings. Unfortunately, the light angle is such that it's too dark under the wing to reveal the hull curvature or any details. It was driving me crazy, trying to integrate a contradiction with reality, and as you all know, a contradiction will kick your ass, every time! Fortunately, I know that contradictions do not exist, and so I worried that part of the design until I found the answer.



Together, these two images tell the whole story, and later, when I get the high-rez version of the B/W image above, I'll be able to see a great deal more of those features. For now, this is just fine for modeling the larger strokes, and zeroing in on the end of my goal.

Thanks to all of you who are making my life easier, especially those of you who do not wish to be credited here, I'm thinking of you with gratitude.

One other thing. I've pointed out, as have others, the flaws in Simon Atkinson's drawings, but these are not his fault. Like all thoughtless and unnecessary deadlines, they are destructive. Simon was forced to turn over these drawings before they were completed. He was not given the time required to do them properly, though he tried to convince them, some idiot thought it better to try to push the river. So, Simon, if you're reading this, you have our sincere appreciation for doing such a great job in the little time that was afforded you. We have all loved and enjoyed your drawings for they paved the way for some of our own creative endeavors. Thanks.

When I get to be the Dictator, I'm going to allow cruel and unusual punishment for certain crimes against creativity, like artificial deadlines, and for certain other crimes, like waking someone unnecessarily. LOL

Message edited by LeonArtO3D on 2/14/2011 - 1:36 AM

Jeeze! Page 4 and 3633 views! This is only 5 weeks old, but it seems like months.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________This page is a little too wide, so you may have to use the scroolbar to see the navigation buttons>>>>>>>

Here's an idea for one of you math genius. Devise a program that compares photographs of a particular object and detects patterns, giving each point a unique identifier, then locates all such identifiers on all the other photos being considered, then translates all that data into a map of the object. Just like you would do if you were devising a navigation program, identifying stars or features on earths surface. Make it so one could feed it known distances between these identifiers, and your program could plot the entire object, in 3D space, for us lazy artists. How difficult could it be?

Clark invented the communication satellite in just this manner. Write it with Nexus. Let me know when you're ready to market it. I'll buy you first version. You don't have to name it after me.

Message edited by LeonArtO3D on 1/30/2011 - 11:40 PM

Page 3 of 11
First  Previous  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  Next  Last